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Tassel Christmas Stocking Sewing Project

Add a bit of fun to your stockings this Christmas with some colourful tassel trim! This simple stocking is perfect for beginners, but the mix of colours and patterns make it look just as good as a highly decorated one!

Tassel Christmas Stocking Sewing Project

You Will Need

How to Make

  1. Download, print and cut out your template, sticking the pieces together.
  2. Fold your words fat quarter in half so the words read as normal. Place your template on, pin in place and cut so you have 2 pieces.
  3. Repeat the above for your white on white fabric, so you have 4 pieces in total.
  4. Cut your piece of trim in half and pin each half to the top of your blue stocking pieces, about 2.5 inches down from the top edge. Stitch in place through the centre of the trim. Trim any excess trim that sticks out of the sides.
  5. Put your blue stocking pieces right sides together and stitch from one side of the top edge to the other side with 10mm seam allowance. Leave the top edge open. Clip the curves.
  6. Repeat the above for your white pieces, leaving a gap of about 8cm at the bottom of the stocking for turning out later.
  7. Cut a rectangle of fabric from your blue fabric, approx 3cm x 16cm. Fold in half along the long edge, right sides together. Stitch down the long edge and one short edge with a 10mm seam allowance. Trim the seam allowance and turn right sides out to create a tube. This will be your hanging loop.
  8. Time to layer up your stocking! Leave your white stocking inside out. Turn your blue stocking right sides out, then place inside the white stocking, lining up the top edges, and making sure the right sides are together. Make your hanging loop into a loop and place between the two layers in the corner, pinning so the loop hangs down into the stocking. Pin the white and blue pieces of the top edge together, keeping the seams open.
  9. Stitch all the way along the top edge to create an inside-out stocking.
  10. Turn the stocking out through the gap in the white stocking. Press.
  11. Press under the seam allowance of the gap in the lining, then top stitch shut a few millimetres away from the edge. Push the lining inside the stocking to finish.

November 26, 2019 by Amy Gilbert
Tags: Christmas

Christmas Mitten Handwarmers Sewing Project

Know someone who's always cold? These are the perfect little project for the eternally freezing, and make a great little gift for Christmas too! Simply microwave for a minute to warm them up. A fat quarter will make quite a few of these!

Christmas Mitten Handwarmers Sewing Project

You Will Need

Seam allowance: 10mm

How to Make

  1. Print and cut out the mittens template. Pin to your fabric and cut 4 mittens.
  2. Place two mitten pieces right sides together, and stitch from the bottom straight edge all the way round until you meet the other end of the straight edge.
  3. Clip the curves and trim the seam allowances where you have stitched.
  4. Turn right sides out, then press under the seam allowance of the straight edge.
  5. Fill with rice, leaving a centimetre of space at the top for the rice to move around.
  6. Ladder stitch the straight edge shut by hand, or top stitch with your machine if you can. Repeat for the other mitten.

To use, microwave for a minute to heat up then pop in your pocket to keep your hands warm!

November 25, 2019 by Amy Gilbert
Tags: Christmas

Simple Patchwork Christmas Tree Skirt Sewing Project

Want to pretty up the base of your tree this Christmas? The sight of the stand of my fake tree this year just looked so bad compared to how pretty the tree was that I had to whip up a quick skirt to cover it up and bring some festive fun from the bottom up too! This one is achievable for beginners to patchwork, and only require straight line sewing and some binding.

Simple Patchwork Christmas Tree Skirt Sewing Project

You Will Need

How to Make

  1. To begin, you're going to need to do a bit of measuring and a bit of maths to get the right size for your tree. Measure across your tree base, as far as you want to cover. I extended mine about 10cm past each foot of the tree as overhang. Write down the diameter measurement from end point to end point for the skirt, then measure the inner circle where the pole will go and write the diameter for this down too. My measurements were 90cm for the outer circle and 7.6cm for the inner circle.
  2. Now you need to do some maths in order to create a template. Work out the circumference of the outer circle (pie x diameter), then divide this by 12. Add 2cm for seam allowances to your total. Mine worked out as 23.5cm plus 2cm for SA so 25.5cm altogether.
  3. Repeat for the inner circle circumference and divide by 12 again, adding 2cm for seam allowances to the total once more.
  4. Now you can use these two numbers to create your segment template! Grab a large piece of paper or tissue paper and mark the full diameter of the outer circle that you measured from the tree, across one straight edge.
  5. Now find the mid point and mark this. Pivot your tape measure from this point and use the half measurement to mark out points to make a semi circle. Join the dots to create the outside curve of the semicircle. (You don't need to draw the whole semi-circle if you don't want to, a quarter of it should be sufficient).
  6. Repeat the above process for the inner circle, creating a small semi circle from the original midpoint of your outer circle.
  7. Now to mark out your segment, measure the outer circle from the straight edge down to your pie measurement for the outer circle that you calculated earlier (25.5cm for me). Mark this point.
  8. Repeat the same for the inner circle with the inner circle pie measurement and mark. 
  9. Draw a straight line between these two marks and you have your segment! Cut it out and you're ready to start on your fabric now.
  10. Use the template to cut 5 of the red snowflake fabric, and 3 each of the robin prints. Don't forget these are directional so you can't cut them upside down!
  11. Start with one robin print and pin one snowflake piece along one straight edge, right sides together. Stitch with a 10mm seam allowance.
  12. Repeat the above process, alternating robin prints and red snowflake pieces so you always have a red next to a robin. 
  13. When you've stitched them all together, trim any loose threads and press open the seams.
  14. Next, cut your backing fabric to size by laying your patchwork piece on top of your backing, pinning and cutting round to size. Repeat for the wadding if you are using wadding.
  15. Sandwich your layers together, then stitch in the ditch along your existing seams to hold everything together. (Stitch in the ditch is simply stitching over your seam line on the right side - take your time for an accurate finish).
  16. Attach some 25mm bias binding tape to the edges, pinning at regular intervals. I started at the top of the gap of the patchwork pieces, where it meets the inner circle, and worked my way down and round the outside, then back up the other side of the gap, finishing with the inner circle. I recommend putting your pins in perpendicular to the binding to help hold the shape better and reduce twisting. Gently fold the bias at the corners to create neat corners. Stitch with a small seam allowance, making sure to catch the edges below. 
  17. If you want to, hand sew some ribbon to the edges of the gap to tie it together (I didn't bother).

 

November 14, 2019 by Amy Gilbert
Tags: Christmas

Plaited Christmas Wreath Project

This project was made for fat quarters, so if you've got a few in your stash or a pack to hand, get going on this festive project to welcome guests into your home this winter!

Plaited Christmas Wreath Project

You Will Need

How to Make

  1. From each of your fat quarters, cut two strips measuring 55cm x 16cm. 
  2. Join the short ends of each pair of same strips using a 5mm seam allowance, to great one long strip. Don't forget to check your print is going the same way!
  3. Next, fold each strip in half lengthways and pin the two long edges right sides together. Stitch across one short edge and then the long edge, using a 10mm seam allowance.
  4. Trim the corners and the seam allowances down by half.
  5. Turn the tubes right sides out.
  6. It's time to start stuffing! Firstly start by safety pinning the three closed ends of your strips together. 
  7. Start stuffing each tube a bit at a time - I found using a plastic ruler really helped me to push it down, especially at the start! Stuff a short section of all three and try plaiting them to see if you need to increase or reduce the amount of stuffing to achieve a good plait.
  8. When you are happy, continue stuffing each tube to the end. Then, plait each of the sections until you reach the end.
  9. Fold under the open edges and top stitch to secure.
  10. Hand stitch the ends of the plait in place on each end of the plait. 
  11. Then, hand stitch the two ends of the plait together.
  12. Finally, hide the join with a beautiful red satin bow. You can either hang your wreath from this, or create a small hanging loop on the bag with thread or ribbon to hang it from.

If you think your plait won't hold it's shape when hung up, you can add some wire to the inside of your tubes to help with structure - just make sure to do this before you stitch up the open end!

November 07, 2019 by Amy Gilbert
Tags: Christmas

Scandi Table Treat Bags Sewing Project

If you want a more eco-friendly alternative to crackers on your Christmas table this year, try out these simple treat bags which can be refilled with yummy little treats every year. Or pop an alternative gift in like a little table game or a scratch card!

Scandi Table Treat Bags Sewing Project

You will need

Seam allowance: 10mm 

How to Make 

  1. Cut a square of the labels and turn under the seam allowance. If you’re using a fat quarter of Christmas fabric instead, cut a square approximately 9.5cm square and follow the above.
  2. Cut two pieces measuring 16cm x 28cm from the calico. Place the label on the front part approx. 12cm down from the top and centred. Stitch around the label to secure.
  3. Cut a piece of ribbon and position underneath, then sew around with a narrow seam allowance of about 3mm.
  4. Turn over the top of the bag 4cm on the inside and sew across.
  5. With right sides together sew around the sides and bottom of the bag then press and turn out.
  6. Fill with goodies and tie with ribbon at the top.

October 13, 2019 by Amy Gilbert
Tags: Christmas

Scandi Table Runner Sewing Project

If you want to add a bit of handmade prettiness to your Christmas table this year, have a go at this simple scandi runner. The squares fabric design gives a faux patchwork effect without all the hard work, so it's actually a pretty straightforward sew!

Scandi Table Runner Sewing Project

You Will Need

Seam allowance: 10mm

How to Make

  1. Cut between the labels to make a piece 28cm x 110cm for the body of the table runner. This leaves you with one row of labels for other projects.
  2. Cut 3 strips of the linen look fabric 6cm x 110cm for the border.
  3. To make the border, attach the long edges of the strips to the long edges of the labels, right sides together. Press and then use the third strip of linen fabric to attach an end border to each end, cutting to size as needed. Press and trim seams.
  4. Cut your wadding to the same size as your table runner front. Pin the front to the wadding – you can sew around the square designs onto the wadding to secure as much as you want.
  5. Sew the ribbon on the short edges 1cm from the edge if you want to add this detail, or leave as a plain border.
  6. Cut the backing from the remaining linen look fabric – you will have to make a join of fabric at each end to fit the backing. To do this cut another 6cm x 110cm strip from the remaining fabric and cut to the width of the table runner – then attach one at each end of the main backing then press.
  1. With right sides together, sew the front with wadding attached to the back, leaving a 10cm gap on the outer edge to turn out. Turn out and press.
  2. Hand sew the final 10cm gap to finish.

October 13, 2019 by Amy Gilbert
Tags: Christmas

Cut-out Christmas Tree Cushion Sewing Project

Get that festive feeling all round your home with this fun Christmas tree inspired cushion! It's achievable even for beginners with no zip, just an envelope back and straight line sewing. If you love the design but don't want a cushion, it can easily be modified to make a wall hanging - just add wadding to the middle and bind the edges.

Finished size 40x40cm.

Cut-out Christmas Tree Cushion Sewing Project

You Will Need

How to Make

  1. Start by cutting your cream snowflake fabric into a rectangle measuring 43cm x 55cm (the longest side of your fat quarter). Cut this in half from long side to long side, so you are left with two rectangles of fabric each measuring 43cm x 27.5cm. 
  2. Hem one of the 43cm sides on each rectangle by turning under by 1cm, stitching at 5mm, then turning under again and stitching close to the edge, about 2-3mm away. Press flat. These will create the envelope back of your cushion.
  3. Cut your trees fabric down to a square measuring 43cm x 43cm. This will be the front of your cushion.
  4. Cut out your tree template pieces and position in place on the back of the trees fabric. You want to put the top triangle so the tip is 21.5cm in from the left hand edge and 6.5cm down from the top edge. Place each subsequent piece lined up below with a 2.5cm gap between each piece. Pin in place and drawn around with a marker or pencil.
  5. Now the scary bit! Take some fine embroidery scissors and make a snip in the centre of each of your traced shapes, enough to get your scissors in. Then cut a straight line out to each corner, being careful to end your snip exactly on the corner. Fold the fabric inside the lines back on itself on the line you have drawn, to create a hole the same shape as the template. Cut down to about 1cm on each edge and press flat. These will form the shape of your cut-out tree. 


  6. Cut a rectangle of your green snowflake fabric measuring 31cm x 25.5cm and place behind the cut outs you have made so the right side shows through to match the right side of the cream snowflake fabric. Pin in place around each cut out to stop the fabric moving. Trim down any excess fabric to a few centimetres away from your pins. 
  7. Carefully top stitch around each cut-out 2-3mm away from the edge for each piece. Take your time and don't rush, but don't worry if your lines aren't perfectly straight as you can't really notice it once it's finished. 
  8. Once complete, trim down the backing piece a bit more precisely and press everything flat. 
  9. Time to assemble the cushion! Lay your front piece right side up and layer up with your two backing pieces right sides down, making sure they overlap. Pin around the edges. Stitch all round the edge using a 1.5cm seam allowance.
  10. Trim the corners and seam allowances, then turn right sides out and press. Pop your cushion pad in and you're ready to relax in comfort with a Christmas movie!

October 06, 2019 by Amy Gilbert
Tags: Christmas

DIY Penguin Christmas Stocking Project

We're in full on preparation mode for Christmas now, trying to get organised with our long list of projects we want to get done in time for December! This week we're focusing on stockings, and although we love our stocking panels, you can't beat a fun novelty one like this little guy! It's more of an intermediate project than one for complete beginners but there's no complex sewing - it's just a bit fiddly in a couple of places. The kids will love him!

DIY Penguin Christmas Stocking Project

You Will Need

How to Make

  1. Print off your templates and stick together, then cut out each piece. Don't separate the main body and tummy pieces yet!
  2. Pin and cut out two penguin body pieces from your black spray time fabric, and one from your wadding. Fold this pattern piece along the lines indicated at the sides on the pattern to create a long straight edge across the top. Use this as a template to cut your penguin fronts from the black fabric - you will need 2 of these. Finally, cut 4 penguin wings using the template on page 1. 
  3. Place the two penguin fronts WRONG SIDES TOGETHER and fold and hem the top straight edge with a narrow seam allowance (approx 8mm). This will form the top of the stocking pocket. 
  4. Cut out the penguin tummy from the rest of the penguin body template, then pin and cut one from your white-on-white fabric. Repeat on your Bondaweb. 
  5. Attach the gluey side of the Bondaweb to the wrong side of your tummy piece using a warm iron and a pressing cloth. Let cool, then peel off the backing paper and position on the front of your penguin front, lining up the bottom corners. Press in place again with iron and pressing cloth. At this point, you can add some decorative/applique stitching around the tummy piece if you want but I chose not to.
  6. Cut out two eye pieces from your white-on-white fabric, and two pupils from your black spray time fabric. Cut 2 of each again from Bondaweb and attach the Bondaweb to the back of each piece. Adhere the pupils to the eye pieces, lining up the bottom edges. 
  7. Lay out your penguin body pieces and lay your penguin front on top to check the layout. Place your eyes above the pocket front, where you think you might want them - don't forget you will have a seam allowance of 10mm on each side edge. When you're happy with the placement, iron in place. 
  8. Next, cut two beaks and four feet pieces from your orange fabric. Stitch each 2 pieces the same together with a 10mm seam allowance, trim seam allowance and turn right sides out. Stuff and baste closed. 

  9. Fold in your seam allowance on the open end of your beak and top stitch shut. Then place under the eyes of your penguin, checking the placement. When you are happy, flip the beak up to face the top of the head and hand stitch in place along your beak stitching, then pull the beak down into normal place and pop an extra stitch in close to the end to help hold it down a bit. 

  10. Stitch, stuff and baste your wings as you did for your feet. 
  11. Now it's time to layer up, make sure you pay attention when you do this or it can go very wrong! Make a sandwich, layered as so:
    Wadding body
    Back of body
    Wings and feet, facing inside (you may find it best to baste these in place)
    Ribbon, folded into a loop and placed upside down at the top of the head
    Front pocket
    Front with face
  12. Pin all the way around on the wadding side. 
  13. Stitch all the way round using a 10mm seam allowance, starting and ending at one side of the head and leaving a gap of around 6-8cm at the start and finish for turning out. Once stitched, trim your seam allowances.
  14. Turn right sides out, and press (your bondaweb may need re-attaching). Press the seam allowance of the gap to the inside, then hand stitch closed using ladder stitch. Remove any basting stitches you can see.
  15. Last but not least, we've got to make his scarf! Fold your piece of tartan fabric in half lengthways, and then do the same again to create a long narrow piece. Stitch with a 15mm seam allowance down the open end, then turn the tube out. 
  16. Lay the scarf around the penguin's neck as so, folding one end under and then over the other piece to create a 'knot'. Hand stitch the scarf in place, attaching the top of the scarf edge to the top edge of the pocket on each side. 




September 22, 2019 by Amy Gilbert
Tags: Christmas

DIY Mini Scandi Advent Houses Project

If you love scandi styling when it comes to Christmas, have a crack at these super simple hanging advent houses. They can be hung up anywhere you like, from the tree to the fireplace - just fill with yummy goodies!

DIY Mini Scandi Advent Houses Project

You Will Need:

Method:

  1. Start by cutting out your squares of Makower fabric. This fabric is already pre-printed with the perfect sized squares, simply add a 1cm seam allowance around each edge to maximise the design. If you're using regular Christmas fabric, cut yourself a square around 7-8cm square (including seam allowance). You can make these as big or small as you like if you're using Christmas fabric but bear in mind that the smaller they are, the more fiddly they are to turn out!

  2. Place your square onto your linen fabric and line it up with at least one edge on the bottom and/or sides. Using this as a template, draw a triangle on top from each of the top corners upwards, creating a house shape. Cut this out. Use this as a template to cut more - you will need two per house, so 48 in total for 24 houses.


  3. Press under the top edges of each of your square designs, along the top edge of the coloured square. Stitch across the top with about 3mm seam allowance in a co-ordinating colour (we used a mix of red and grey thread depending on the design).



  4. Now it's time to add your numbers! Lay your square onto the house front, lining the top of the square up to where the roof triangle starts - you will need to trim the bottom of the linen here to fit, on both pieces. Use a pencil to lightly trace out your number in the centre (don't forget you will have seam allowances for the roof too).



  5. Use your embroidery thread to stitch on the numbers - basic long stitches are fine!



  6. Layer up your house - start with the house front with it's number on the bottom, facing up. Add the hemmed square design on top, lining it up. Cut a length of satin ribbon approx 10cm long, fold in half and place the cut ends on the point of the roof with the loop hanging down into the house - tack in place if necessary. Finally, lay the linen house back on top and pin everything in place.





  7. Stitch on your machine starting 3/4 of the way down one of the roof sides, and using a 10mm seam allowance all the way round. Stop stitching when you get back round to where you started, leaving a gap of at least 4cm for turning out. Don't forget to back stitch at the start and end!



  8. Trim your seam allowance and clip curves. Turn inside out, push out the points and press press press! Press the seam allowances of the gap under.





  9. Hand stitch the gap closed using ladder stitch. 

September 08, 2019 by Amy Gilbert
Tags: Christmas

How to Make a Liberty Christmas Tree

Indulge in your Liberty addiction at Christmas and show off your favourite prints proudly with this fun little project! Great for using up larger scraps, you can size them to whatever material you have left...

How to Make a Liberty Christmas Tree 

You Will Need

How to Make

  1. Start by creating your tree template. We started off by drawing a straight horizontal line 15cm across, found the centre point and measured 26cm up then drew a point. Then simply use a ruler to draw a line from your top point to each end of the 15cm line, to create a triangle shape. You can adjust these measurements easily to make it bigger or smaller but don't forget to take into account the height of your stick.
  2. Next, use your template to cut out two triangles from fabric. If you use a fat quarter of fabric and the print is non-directional, you should be able to get about 5 pairs of triangles from your fabric - enough for a whole forest of Liberty!
  3. Now you need to add your tassel trim. Start at the top of the triangle and create 3 swags hanging diagonally across the tree. You will need to cut and pin three pieces of trim on, making sure your tassels won't get stuck in the seam allowance at the edge. Repeat for your second triangle if you want the tassels on both sides.
  4. Stitch the trim on with a white thread, stitching along the top and bottom of the trim strip. Trim any excess that overhangs the edges of the triangles.
  5. Place your triangles right sides together and pin in place, making sure all tassels are tucked inside and well away from the edges. Then, sew all round the edges using a 1cm seam allowance, and leaving a gap of about 5cm at the centre of the bottom of the triangle to turn out.
  6. Trim your seam allowance, clip the corners and turn out. Press and press the seam allowance of your gap under at the same time.
  7. Stuff the tree with your toy stuffing, then pop the stick into its base and insert into the tree, adjusting your stuffing so that it sits right. 
  8. Finally, hand stitch the gap closed, up to the stick on each side.

 

December 02, 2018 by Amy Gilbert
Tags: Christmas